June: Highlights

june vmmv highlights

june vmmv highlights

1. | 2. | 3. | 4. | 5. | 6. |

 I am honestly becoming really rather worried about the state of these months. I hardly even get used to the idea of being in one and it’s over. June has been a month for gaining some satisfaction for long-made plans: I’m two-thirds of the way through my annoyingly difficult tests for my new adventure, I finally got admitted to my program (for all of modernity’s speed, Universities still like to kick it old-style and snail crawl every move), my blog has begun to do some behind-the-scenes shifting (yay, yay, yay!) in the very capable hands of someone you will hopefully learn more about in the near future, and I’m beginning to see little light glimmers at the end of some tunnels I felt like would never reach fresh air again.

Even though I think I put on a pretty convincing facade, I’m really not a very patient person. I want things done and I want them done NOW and I will plan and organize and work hard to get them done unlesssss those things that need to be done are out of my hands and then the oh so helpless feelings of relying on other people begin to gnaw away at my (I admit it!) control-freak self. Thankfully, while I was patiently desperately, tearfully, and whining-ly waiting pacing this month, I did seem to have some excellent time with my wonderful dad, made a few treats, tried a few projects, and had a good stiff drink (sort of). I also began to come to terms with a new path even though sometimes things slip a bit, and in the end was reminded for the 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 time that I should probably not worry so much?…yeah, it’s a good idea at least, isn’t it?

– <3 A. 

When Things Start Slipping

watermelon cake

watermelon dessertThere is a point between control and out of control when things just start slipping. Nothing too terrible has really happened, or isn’t likely to happen, but you have that uneasy feeling that life has slipped a bit. When your head is so full of dates and deadlines, of people and problems, of mundane to-do’s and big wishful thoughts that everything begins a slow-mo slide down from the control tower of your brain.

This “cake”? It became a metaphor for that emotion: I tried to make that beautiful and brilliant watermelon cake for Father’s Day, have you seen it on Pinterest? It looked so refreshing and so easy and I was super excited to give it a go for Dad’s day. But about ten seconds into icing the watermelon with my cool whip frosting, I realized this was not going to be a very merry dessert. Nothing sticks to watermelon, did you know that? I really want to know how other people do it because from the moment I began frosting to the moment I realized I was NOT going to serve this guy, my icing did a slow, sad, soggy slide down the sides of my melon and concluded in creating a watermelon-juice-soggy-moat at the bottom of the fruit dome. MMmmmm, now doesn’t that sound delightful? I did try to regain control, in fact, all things considered it was a fairly heroic attempt: I added the raspberries I was going to decorate the top with to try and give the icing a bit of a grip, but this only succeeded in quickening its descent downward. Then I thought, well, why waste the sugar-coated walnuts? That might add some much-needed crunch to the mess so I threw those on as well, and, because the walnuts I guess wanted to add to the whole effect of the fail, they decided to be rancid and that at last concluded my attempts of cake-salvation.

I guess if metaphors give us morals then the moral of this one is, if things are slipping, something’s gotta give because if you don’t choose to throw something out, trust me, it will slip all by itself, despite your best struggles to save.

 – <3 A. 

Other VMMV Recipes (that worked!) 

header  DSC_0701-002  lemon cheesecake cocktail

    Coffee Squared               Lemon Raspberry Cake       Lemon Cheesecake

Guest Pinner: If Clarence Day Pinned

life with father guest pinner

life with father guest pinner

life with father guest pinnerLife with Father repins via | via | via

In the 1947 film version of Clarence Day Jr’s novel Life with Father, William Powell plays the ridiculous, yet wise, often irate, yet quickly made gentle, father of the Day family and a perfect muse for a modern Father’s Day. Clarence Day is an ambitious financier on Wall Street and is something of a faux tyrant in his household, for his wife Vinnie and four sons have learned that underneath his irate and buttoned-up exterior, he’s something of a loving, gentle soul, adoring his wife and unfailingly proud of his sons. If anyone could make pinning a masculine past-time, I’m pretty sure Clarence Day would be the man sophisticated enough to pull it off.

If you’ve noticed a trend from my last few guest pinners, local milk is one of my new favs for pinterest-pinning-pros. She’s got such an organic yet vintage style among her boards that is quite alluring!

– <3 A. 

Other Guest Pinners: 

 houseofmirthpin    littlewomencollage

             Lily Bart                               Mrs. March

DIY One-Seam Tie

one seam tie

dimensions

diytie

one seam tieOk, so maybe ties are the #1 cliched Fathers Day gift and maybe your dad has 5000 hanging in his closet out of which 5 may be worn at random intervals throughout the year but there’s also five very good reasons why this tie is better than those other 5000:

  1. This will probably be the only skinny tie not made of wool he’s had since the 70’s
  2. You made it soooo…automatically you win
  3. Its ONE seam!!
  4. It can be turned into a wrapping 
  5. You have control over the fabric choice and tie width which =’s a much needed dad update

The dimensions I have are for a 1.5 inch skinny tie: the skinniest of skinny ties. If you want a wider cut, just double the cut of your original strip. Whatever size your original cut is, the actual tie will be half as wide after a seam allowance, and turning it right-sides out again. When you’re cutting the strip, start at the wide end and about halfway along the strip, begin to taper your cut down, ending at the narrowest side. Also, DON’T sew the end seams together until you’ve ironed the long seam into the proper place, otherwise it won’t lay right. I had a very wonky looking tie my first go-around when I sewed everything up before ironing!

– <3 A.